Showing 1 – 20 of 977
Relevance | Newest | Oldest |
  • Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography vs Functional Stress Testing for Patients With Suspected Coronary Artery Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Abstract Full Text
    is active quiz
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(11):1623-1631. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.4772

    This systematic review and meta-analysis compares the clinical effectiveness of coronary computed tomography angiography with that of functional stress testing for patients with suspected coronary artery disease.

  • Association of Frequency of Lipid Testing With Changes in Lipid-Lowering Therapy

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(10):1529-1531. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.3954

    This study examines clinician rationale for ordering monitoring lipid panels among patients on statin therapy and the association of treatment changes with testing.

  • Effect of Electronic Reminders, Financial Incentives, and Social Support on Outcomes After Myocardial Infarction: The HeartStrong Randomized Clinical Trial

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(8):1093-1101. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.2449

    This randomized clinical trial investigates whether a system of medication reminders using financial incentives and social support delays subsequent vascular events in patients following acute myocardial infarction compared with usual care.

  • Effect of Statin Treatment vs Usual Care on Primary Cardiovascular Prevention Among Older Adults: The ALLHAT-LLT Randomized Clinical Trial

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(7):955-965. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.1442

    This post hoc secondary analysis of older adults in the randomized clinical trial ALLHAT-LLT compares statin treatment vs usual care for primary cardiovascular prevention.

  • Risks of Statin Therapy in Older Adults

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(7):966-966. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.1457
  • Association of Statin Use With Risk of Back Disorder Diagnoses

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(7):1044-1046. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.1068

    This study analyzes data of patients enrolled in the US Department of Defense’s TRICARE insurance to determine the association of statin use with risk of back disorder diagnoses.

  • Association of Perioperative Statin Use With Mortality and Morbidity After Major Noncardiac Surgery

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(2):231-242. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.8005

    This cohort study evaluates associations of early perioperative statin use with outcomes in a national cohort of patients in the Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program database who underwent noncardiac surgery.

  • Perioperative Statin Use in Noncardiac Surgery: Who and When?

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(2):242-243. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.8037
  • Statins for Primary Prevention: The Debate Is Intense, but the Data Are Weak

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(1):21-23. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.7585
  • Lipid Screening in Children: Low-Value Care

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(10):1437-1438. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.5114

    This Editorial discusses the US Preventive Services Task Force recommendations statement on screening for lipid disorders in children and adolescents and the low value this screening has.

  • JAMA Internal Medicine September 1, 2016

    Figure: Number of Monthly Prescriptions for Statins in the Veterans Affairs Healthcare System

    Data are from the VA Pharmacy Benefits Management national dispensing records from December 2010 to May 2013. The vertical lines represent the months when generic atorvastatin first entered the market with limited competition (December 2011) and 6 months later on entry of additional generic products and full generic competition (June 2012).aIncludes combination products with niacin.bIncludes fluvastatin, pitavastatin, and the combination of ezetimibe and simvastatin.
  • Effect of Generic Competition on Atorvastatin Prescribing and Patients’ Out-of-Pocket Spending

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(9):1317-1323. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.3384

    This population-based cohort study evaluates trends in the prescription and cost of generic atorvastatin among patients with commercial insurance coverage.

  • Prescription of Brand-Name Medications When Generic Alternatives Are Available—Patently Unfair

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(9):1323-1324. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.3389
  • Association Between Achieved Low-Density Lipoprotein Levels and Major Adverse Cardiac Events in Patients With Stable Ischemic Heart Disease Taking Statin Treatment

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(8):1105-1113. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.2751

    This study assesses the relationship between low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels achieved with statin treatment and cardiovascular events in patients with preexisting ischemic heart disease.

  • Pharmaceutical Industry–Sponsored Meals and Physician Prescribing Patterns for Medicare Beneficiaries

    Abstract Full Text
    free access is active quiz
    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(8):1114-1122. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.2765

    This study explores whether receipt of pharmaceutical industry-sponsored meals by physicians is associated with their prescribing the promoted brand-name drug at higher rates to Medicare beneficiaries.

  • JAMA Internal Medicine August 1, 2016

    Figure 1: Target Branded Drugs as a Percentage of All Filled Prescriptions in the Class in 2013, Across Days Receiving Target Drug–Sponsored Meals

    Filled prescriptions for each target branded drug are shown as a percentage of all prescriptions within the class, according to number of days receiving target drug-sponsored meals. A, Statins. B, Cardioselective β-blockers. C, Angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-receptor blockers (ACE inhibitors and ARBs). D, Selective serotonin and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs and SNRIs). Sample sizes for Figure 1 are shown in the last 5 rows of Table 2. Error bars indicate 95% confidence intervals.
  • JAMA Internal Medicine August 1, 2016

    Figure 4: Multivariable Clinical Predictors of Incident Conduction System Disease

    Error bars denote 95% CIs. Hazard ratios (HRs) describe the adjusted association between the given variable and any incident conduction system disease after controlling for all included clinical variables, antihypertensive treatment assignment, and statin treatment assignment. GFR indicates glomerular filtration rate; HDL, high-density lipoprotein; and LDL, low-density lipoprotein.aIndicates per 10-year increase.bIndicates compared with non-Hispanic white participants. Participants who did not identify as white, black, or Hispanic were included as other.cIndicates per 5-unit increase.dIndicates per 10-mL/min/1.73 m2 increase.eIndicates per 1-mEq/L increase.fIndicates per 10-mg/dL increase.
  • JAMA Internal Medicine August 1, 2016

    Figure 2: Predicted Probabilities for Prescribing the Target Drug as a Percentage of All Prescriptions in the Class, According to the Number and Cost of Sponsored Meals Received by Each Physician

    The figure shows predicted probabilities for prescribing the target drug over alternatives within the treatment class, based on the cost and number of meals received promoting the target drug. Predicted probabilities are calculated for physicians with the highest-frequency values of all characteristics in Table 1 (male sex, internal medicine specialty, Southern region, urban location, group size ≥51, ≥20 years since medical school graduation, and mean values for prescribing volume, income in zip code, and percentage of low-income subsidy and Medicare Advantage Part D patients). A, Statins. B, Cardioselective β-blockers. C, Angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-receptor blockers (ACE inhibitors and ARBs). D, Selective serotonin and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs and SNRIs). Error bars indicate 95% confidence intervals.
  • Can Cardiac Conduction System Disease Be Prevented?

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(8):1093-1094. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.2863
  • Effect of the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT) on Conduction System Disease

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(8):1085-1092. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.2502

    This secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial assesses the effect of pharmacologic therapy and clinical risk factors on incident conduction system disease in patients with hypertension.