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  • Lung Cancer Mortality Associated With Smoking and Smoking Cessation Among People Living With HIV in the United States

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(11):1613-1621. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.4349

    This validated microsimulation model evaluates the risk of lung cancer death by smoking exposure for persons living with human immunodeficiency virus.

  • Effect of Patient Navigation and Financial Incentives on Smoking Cessation Among Primary Care Patients at an Urban Safety-Net Hospital: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.4372

    This randomized clinical trial evaluates a multicomponent intervention to promote smoking cessation among smokers with low socioeconomic status and smokers who are minorities.

  • Intervention With Brief Cessation Advice Plus Active Referral for Proactively Recruited Community Smokers: A Pragmatic Cluster Randomized Clinical Trial

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.5793

    This pragmatic cluster randomized clinical trial evaluates the effectiveness of advice plus referral to smoking cessation services in individuals with varying levels and lengths of smoking.

  • Smoking Cessation Pharmacotherapy Among Smokers Hospitalized for Coronary Heart Disease

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(10):1525-1527. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.3489

    This study uses data from the Premier Alliance database to assess factors associated with the use of smoking cessation pharmacotherapy in smokers hospitalized for coronary heart disease.

  • Association of Long-term, Low-Intensity Smoking With All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality in the National Institutes of Health–AARP Diet and Health Study

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(1):87-95. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.7511

    This cohort study evaluates association of low-intensity smoking with a lifetime risk of all-cause and cause-specific mortality in individuals in the National Institutes of Health–AARP Diet and Health Study.

  • JAMA Internal Medicine January 1, 2017

    Figure: Association Between Smoking Status and All-Cause Mortality

    Hazard ratios among lifelong consistent smokers of fewer than 1 cigarette per day (CPD) (A) and (B) 1 to 10 CPD relative to never smokers. Includes individuals with complete information on smoking frequency at different age stages, including those who reported not smoking at 1 or more age stages (20-24, 25-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, and ≥70 years) but reported smoking at a later age stage; those who started smoking at 60 years or older were excluded. Data were adjusted for sex, race/ethnicity (non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, Asian, Pacific islander, American Indian or Alaskan native, and unknown), educational level (
  • JAMA Internal Medicine January 1, 2017

    Figure 3: Adjusted In-Trial Hazard Ratios for Hip or Pelvic Fracture in Those Randomized to Receive Chlorthalidone Compared With Amlodipine or Lisinopril

    Hazards ratios (HRs) were adjusted for age, race, sex, diabetes, baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD), body mass index, and smoking. For estrogen, analyses are for women only. CKD indicates chronic kidney disease; DM, diabetes mellitus; and MDRD, Modification of Diet in Renal Disease.
  • State-Level Cancer Mortality Attributable to Cigarette Smoking in the United States

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(12):1792-1798. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.6530

    This study calculates the proportion of cancer deaths among adults 35 years and older that were attributable to cigarette smoking in each US state and the District of Columbia.

  • JAMA Internal Medicine December 1, 2016

    Figure 1: Rank and Proportion of Cancer Mortality Attributable to Cigarette Smoking in 2014

    States are ranked by the proportion of cancer deaths attributable to cigarette smoking, from highest (1) to lowest (51). States were categorized into 4 groups (group 1, states ranked 1-10; group 2, rank 11-40; group 3, rank 41-50; and group 4, Utah alone as the proportion was substantially lower than in any other state). The color of the state indicates the rank group. aWashington, DC.
  • JAMA Internal Medicine December 1, 2016

    Figure 2: National Proportion of Cancer Deaths Attributable to Cigarette Smoking, by Race and Ethnicity, in 2014

    Proportion of cancer deaths attributable to smoking for both sexes: non-Hispanic (NH) white, 26.0% (95% CI, 24.7%-26.2%); NH black, 27.2% (95% CI, 25.6%-28.2%); and Hispanic, 19.8% (95% CI, 19.0%-21.8%). For men: NH white, 30.4% (95% CI, 28.7%-31.0%); NH black, 34.9% (32.3%-36.4%); and Hispanic, 26.7% (95% CI, 25.4%-30.0%). For women: NH white, 21.1% (95% CI, 19.6%-21.4%); NH black, 19.3% (95% CI, 17.5%-20.6%); and Hispanic, 12.3% (95% CI, 10.7%-14.0%). Error bars indicate 95% confidence intervals.
  • The Case for a Concerted Push to Reduce Place-Based Disparities in Smoking-Related Cancers

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(12):1799-1800. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.6865
  • JAMA Internal Medicine November 1, 2016

    Figure: Age-Incidence Curves for Incident Myocardial Infarction (MI) in Men and Women

    A, Crude incidence rates increase with age for both sexes rather slowly until the age of 65 to 69 years, then more rapidly up to age 95 years. B, Predicted age-incidence rates, modeled as a fourth-order polynomial in Poisson regression analysis of person-years at risk, fit crude (observed) age-incidence curves well. The incidence rate ratio (IRR) of MI for men vs women decreased with age but persisted throughout life. C, Sex heterogeneity in risk of MI (IRR) remains substantial in young and old persons after adjustment for birth cohort, HDL-C in percent of total cholesterol, diastolic blood pressure, and daily smoking (incidence rates shown for reference categories of adjustment factors).
  • Association Between Distance From Home to Tobacco Outlet and Smoking Cessation and Relapse

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(10):1512-1519. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.4535

    This study uses data from 2 survey studies to examine associations between change in home-to-tobacco-outlet distance and change in smoking status among community-dwelling Finns.

  • JAMA Internal Medicine October 1, 2016

    Figure 1: Selection of Study Participants

    Finnish Public Sector (FPS) participants who responded to the survey both in 2008 or 2009 and 2012 or 2013 (n = 53 755, 79% of the eligible 2008/2009 respondents) and the Health and Social Support (HeSSup) participants who responded both in 2003 and 2012 (n = 11 924, 63% of the eligible 2003 participants) were included. Current and ex-smokers were included only and those who reported never smoking at baseline were excluded. In addition, those with missing data on smoking in either survey, not residing in mainland Finland, or with unsuccessful geocoding of residential address were excluded. The analytic sample was therefore 15 218 FPS and 5511 HeSSup participants.
  • Comparison of Health and Health Risk Factors Between Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Adults and Heterosexual Adults in the United States: Results From the National Health Interview Survey

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(9):1344-1351. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.3432

    This study uses National Health Interview Survey data to compare health and health risk factors between lesbian, gay, and bisexual adults and heterosexual adults in the United States.

  • JAMA Internal Medicine August 1, 2016

    Figure 1: Change in Total Mortality Associated With Increases in the Percentage of Energy From Specific Types of Fat

    Multivariable hazard ratios of total mortality associated with replacing the percentage of energy from total carbohydrates by the same energy from specific types of fat (P < .001 for trend for all) were used. The model was adjusted for age (in months), white race (yes vs no), marital status (with spouse, yes or no), body mass index (<23.0, 23.0-24.9, 25.0-29.9, 30.0-34.9, or ≥35.0 [calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared]), physical activity (<3.0, 3.0-8.9, 9.0-17.9, 18.0-26.9, or ≥27.0 h of metabolic equivalent tasks per week), smoking status (never, past, current 1-14 cigarettes/d, current 15-24 cigarettes/d, or current ≥25 cigarettes/d), alcohol consumption (women: 0, 0.1-4.9, 5.0-14.9, or ≥15.0 g/d; men: 0, 0.1-4.9, 5.0-29.9, or ≥30.0 g/d), multivitamin use (yes vs no), vitamin E supplement use (yes vs no), current aspirin use (yes vs no), family history of myocardial infarction (yes vs no), family history of diabetes (yes vs no), family history of cancer (yes vs no), history of hypertension (yes vs no), history of hypercholesterolemia (yes vs no), intakes of total energy and dietary cholesterol (quintiles), percentage of energy intake from dietary protein (quintiles), menopausal status and hormone use in women (premenopausal, postmenopausal never users, postmenopausal past users, or postmenopausal current users), and percentage of energy from the remaining specific types of fat (saturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids, and trans-fatty acids, all modeled as continuous variables). Results for the Nurses’ Health Study and Health Professional Follow-up Study from the multivariable model were combined using the fixed-effects model.
  • JAMA Internal Medicine August 1, 2016

    Figure 2: Multivariable Hazard Ratios (HRs) of Mortality by Isocaloric Substitution of Specific Types of Fatty Acid for Saturated Fatty Acids

    The model was adjusted for age (in months), white race (yes vs no), marital status (with spouse, yes or no), body mass index (<23.0, 23.0-24.9, 25.0-29.9, 30.0-34.9, or ≥35.0 [calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared]), physical activity (<3.0, 3.0-8.9, 9.0-17.9, 18.0-26.9, or ≥27.0 h of metabolic equivalent tasks per week), smoking status (never, past, current 1-14 cigarettes/d, current 15-24 cigarettes/d, or current ≥25 cigarettes/d), alcohol consumption (women: 0, 0.1-4.9, 5.0-14.9, or ≥15.0 g/d; men: 0, 0.1-4.9, 5.0-29.9, or ≥30.0 g/d), multivitamin use (yes vs no), vitamin E supplement use (yes vs no), current aspirin use (yes vs no), family history of myocardial infarction (yes vs no), family history of diabetes (yes vs no), family history of cancer (yes vs no), history of hypertension (yes vs no), history of hypercholesterolemia (yes vs no), intakes of total energy and dietary cholesterol (quintiles), percentage of energy intake from dietary protein (quintiles), menopausal status and hormone use in women (premenopausal, postmenopausal never users, postmenopausal past users, or postmenopausal current users), and percentage of energy from remaining fatty acids (saturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids [PUFAs], monounsaturated fatty acids [MUFAs], trans-fatty acids, ω-6 PUFAs, ω-3 PUFAs, linoleic acid, arachidonic acid, α-linolenic acid, and marine ω-3 fats, all modeled as continuous variables). Results for the Nurses’ Health Study and Health Professional Follow-up Study from the multivariable model were combined using the fixed-effects model. UFA indicates unsaturated fatty acid; and error bars, 95% CI.
  • Association of Leisure-Time Physical Activity With Risk of 26 Types of Cancer in 1.44 Million Adults

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(6):816-825. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.1548

    This study of pooled data from 12 US and European cohorts examines the association of leisure-time physical activity with incidence of 26 common types of cancer and whether the associations vary by body size and/or smoking.

  • Association of Religious Service Attendance With Mortality Among Women

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(6):777-785. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.1615

    This prospective study uses data from the Nurses’ Health Study to evaluate associations between attendance at religious services and mortality in women.

  • Likelihood of Unemployed Smokers vs Nonsmokers Attaining Reemployment in a One-Year Observational Study

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(5):662-670. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.0772

    This study examines differences in reemployment rates of unemployed job seekers who smoke vs those who do not smoke during a 12-month period