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  • JAMA Internal Medicine December 1, 2016

    Figure 2: Intravenous Iron Usage Before and After Policy Changes

    The study population included 69 718 patients 66 years or older who had been enrolled in Medicare parts A, B, or D, for at least 12 months prior to incident hemodialysis initiation. Peripheral lines in panels A and C represent 95% CIs. Hb indicates hemoglobin.
  • JAMA Internal Medicine May 1, 2014

    Figure 2: Trends in Treatment With Intravenous Iron Supplements Prior to End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD)

    A, Proportion of patients receiving any intravenous iron supplementation. B, Specific intravenous iron formulation used in the earliest available claim. C, Adjusted prevalence ratios of intravenous iron use prior to ESRD (referent: 1995). Multivariable model adjusted for age, sex, race, Medicaid (“dual”) eligibility, comorbid diabetes mellitus, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and body mass index at ESRD. Circles indicate prevalence ratio; error bars, 95% confidence interval.
  • Micronutrient Supplementation and Pregnancy Outcomes: Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial in China

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2013; 173(4):276-282. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2013.1632
    To assess how diet influences the response to overeating and energy expenditure, Bray and colleagues randomly assigned ….. Body fat increased similarly regardless of dietary protein content. In an editorial, Li and Hebera discuss implications of these findings for advising patients about healthy weight management.
  • Dietary Supplements and Mortality Rate in Older Women: The Iowa Women's Health Study

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    Arch Intern Med. 2011; 171(18):1625-1633. doi: 10.1001/archinternmed.2011.445
  • Coffee Intake and Glucose Homeostasis: Is There a Role for Body Iron?

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    Arch Intern Med. 2010; 170(15):1400-1401. doi: 10.1001/archinternmed.2010.252
  • JAMA Internal Medicine October 8, 2007

    Figure: Benzocaine-Induced Methemoglobinemia Based on the Mayo Clinic Experience From 28 478 Transesophageal Echocardiograms: Incidence, Outcomes, and Predisposing Factors

    Methemoglobin is a derivative of hemoglobin in which the normal ferrous iron state (Fe2+) is oxidized to the ferric state (Fe3+). Factors contributing to the oxidation of hemoglobin to methemoglobin include oxidizing agents such as benzocaine and states of oxidative stress such as sepsis. The predominant endogenous reducing mechanism of methemoglobin is the enzyme cytochrome b5 reductase. A secondary mechanism of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) methemoglobin reductase is the target of methylene blue.
  • Cognitive Declines Therapy by Iron Burden Reduction

    Abstract Full Text
    Arch Intern Med. 2007; 167(10):1098-1098. doi: 10.1001/archinte.167.10.1098-a
  • Nononcologic Use of Human Recombinant Erythropoietin Therapy in Hospitalized Patients

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    Arch Intern Med. 2007; 167(8):840-846. doi: 10.1001/archinte.167.8.840
  • JAMA Internal Medicine April 23, 2007

    Figure 2: Nononcologic Use of Human Recombinant Erythropoietin Therapy in Hospitalized Patients

    Distribution of mean hematocrit levels and iron stores in admissions for study patients treated with human recombinant erythropoietin (rHuEPO). The bars show the number of admissions with adequate iron stores, functional iron deficiency, and absolute iron deficiency at each hematocrit level. For example, the left-most bar in each cluster of 3 shows the number of admissions with that hematocrit level and adequate iron stores at the time of rHuEPO prescribing. Moving rightward, the middle bar in each cluster shows the number of admissions with that hematocrit level and functional iron deficiency at the time of rHuEPO prescribing, while the right-most bar shows the number of admissions with absolute iron deficiency. A, Overall study population results. B, Admissions with chronic kidney disease. C, Admissions without chronic kidney disease.
  • JAMA Internal Medicine April 23, 2007

    Figure 1: Nononcologic Use of Human Recombinant Erythropoietin Therapy in Hospitalized Patients

    Availability of laboratory data for the 3094 admissions included in the study. Of these admissions, hematocrit readings were available for 2959. Of these 2959 admissions, iron studies were available for 1860. Among the 1099 admissions without iron studies, 472 had other common outpatient laboratory tests performed during the study period, suggesting that laboratory monitoring was occurring but iron levels were not being checked. rHuEPO indicates human recombinant erythropoietin.
  • JAMA Internal Medicine July 10, 2006

    Figure 1: Low Testosterone Levels and the Risk of Anemia in Older Men and Women

    Relationship of total and bioavailable testosterone levels with hemoglobin level in all InCHIANTI participants and restricted to those with normal serum iron levels and no deficiencies of iron, cyanocobalamin (vitamin B12), or folate. Hemoglobin values are age adjusted. The relationships are summarized using locally weighted regression smoothers. To convert testosterone to nanomoles per liter, multiply by 0.0347.
  • JAMA Internal Medicine July 10, 2006

    Figure 2: Low Testosterone Levels and the Risk of Anemia in Older Men and Women

    Crude and age-adjusted prevalence of anemia according to total and bioavailable testosterone level quartiles in all InCHIANTI participants and restricted to cases of unexplained anemia (ie, normal serum iron levels and no deficiencies of iron, cyanocobalamin (vitamin B12), or folate. To convert testosterone to nanomoles per liter, multiply by 0.0347.
  • Screening for Hemochromatosis in Asymptomatic Subjects With or Without a Family History

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    Arch Intern Med. 2006; 166(3):294-301. doi: 10.1001/archinte.166.3.294
  • JAMA Internal Medicine February 13, 2006

    Figure 2: Screening for Hemochromatosis in Asymptomatic Subjects With or Without a Family History

    The relationship between serum ferritin level and mobilizable iron in 328 subjects who underwent phlebotomy.
  • JAMA Internal Medicine February 13, 2006

    Figure 3: Screening for Hemochromatosis in Asymptomatic Subjects With or Without a Family History

    Calculations used to derive the number of years to reach the critical hepatic iron (Fe) threshold of 236 μmol/g dry weight (dw) that defines cirrhosis. A indicates the number of grams of iron present in an adult liver, equivalent to 236 μmol/g dw, where A = B × C × D × E. B indicates the critical hepatic iron threshold of 236 μmol/g dw that defines cirrhosis; C, the molecular weight of iron (56 g/mol); D, the average liver weight (1800 g for men, 1400 g for women); and E, the conversion factor for liver dw to wet liver weight (0.25). F indicates the average iron content of a normal liver (0.8 g for men, 0.3 g for women); G, the rate of iron accumulation, where G = H × I; H, the mean rise in serum ferritin level (76.5 μg/L per year for men, 62.3 μg/L per year for women [see the “Results” section]); and I, the number of grams of iron corresponding to a rise in serum ferritin concentration of 1 μg/L (3.3 mg) (Figure 2). Thus, for men, G = 76.5 × (3.3 × 10−3) = 0.25 g/y; for women, G = 62.3 × (3.3 × 10−3) = 0.21 g/y (see the “Results” section).
  • JAMA Internal Medicine February 13, 2006

    Figure 4: Screening for Hemochromatosis in Asymptomatic Subjects With or Without a Family History

    Reduction in fibrosis following phlebotomy therapy. Twenty-five subjects underwent a second liver biopsy after phlebotomy. Five subjects were excluded from analysis owing to significant alcohol intake (>60 g/d). In the remaining 20 subjects, the fibrosis score improved significantly following removal of iron by phlebotomy except where cirrhosis was present.
  • JAMA Internal Medicine February 13, 2006

    Figure 1: Screening for Hemochromatosis in Asymptomatic Subjects With or Without a Family History

    Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. A, The ROC for hepatic iron concentration threshold distinguishes hemochromatosis patients with cirrhosis from those with no cirrhosis (area under the curve [AUC], 0.86; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.80-0.91; P<.001). B, The ROC curve for serum ferritin threshold distinguishes hemochromatosis patients with cirrhosis from those with no cirrhosis (excluding all subjects with alcohol intake >60 g/d [men] and >50 g/d [women] and serum aminotransferase level >60 U/L [men and women]) (AUC, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.92-1.00; P<.001).
  • Dairy Intake, Reduced Body Iron Stores, and the Development of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Abstract Full Text
    Arch Intern Med. 2005; 165(20):2433-2434. doi: 10.1001/archinte.165.20.2433-b
  • Changing the Clinical Management of Hereditary Hemochromatosis: Translating Screening and Early Case Detection Strategies Into Clinical Practice

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    Arch Intern Med. 2004; 164(9):957-961. doi: 10.1001/archinte.164.9.957
  • Rebuttal by Drs Dubois and Kowdley

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    Arch Intern Med. 2003; 163(20):2427-2427. doi: 10.1001/archinte.163.20.2427