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  • Residency Evaluations—Where Is the Patient Voice?

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.6029
  • Effect of Promoting High-Quality Staff Interactions on Fall Prevention in Nursing Homes: A Cluster-Randomized Trial

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(11):1634-1641. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.5073

    This cluster-randomized trial tests whether a complexity science–based staff training intervention promoting high-quality staff interactions improves the impact of an evidence-based falls quality improvement program.

  • Saying Goodbye

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(11):1565-1565. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.4017
  • Cost-effectiveness of Testing and Treatment for Latent Tuberculosis Infection in Residents Born Outside the United States With and Without Medical Comorbidities in a Simulation Model

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.3941

    This cohort simulation model evaluates the use of tests and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection in residents born outside the United States.

  • Making All Lives Matter in Medicine From the Inside Out

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(10):1413-1414. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.1981

    This Viewpoint examines racial bias in the health care workplace.

  • Effects of an Intervention to Reduce Hospitalizations From Nursing Homes: A Randomized Implementation Trial of the INTERACT Program

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(9):1257-1264. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.2657

    This randomized clinical trial determines whether training and support for implementation of a nursing home quality improvement program reduces hospital admissions and emergency department visits.

  • Characterizing the Source of Text in Electronic Health Record Progress Notes

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(8):1212-1213. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.1548

    This study analyzes inpatient progress notes to determine the documentation practices of medical students, residents, and hospitalists.

  • Comparison of Male vs Female Resident Milestone Evaluations by Faculty During Emergency Medicine Residency Training

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(5):651-657. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.9616

    This study compared faculty evaluation of male vs female emergency medicine resident milestone attainment throughout residency training.

  • JAMA Internal Medicine May 1, 2017

    Figure: Representation of Women Among Grand Rounds (GR) Speakers by Institutional Affiliation and Workforce Demographic Gender Normalization

    A, Percentages of GR sessions presented by nontrainee women by intramural (holding any faculty or staff title at a GR-sponsoring university) vs extramural (holding no faculty or staff title at a GR-sponsoring university) speaker affiliation. Median values indicated by horizontal bars. B, Percentages of GR sessions presented by nontrainee women normalized to percentages of 2013-2014 demographic who are women among enrolled medical students (46.7%) and specialties’ residents and MD- and equivalent degree-holding faculty. Median values indicated by horizontal bars. Values less than 1 indicate that the rate of female-presented GR sessions fell below representation of women in the specialties’ trainee or faculty demographic. OB/GYN indicates obstetrics/gynecology.aP < .01 compared with the intramural speaker affiliation.
  • Implicit Bias in Academic Medicine: #WhatADoctorLooksLike

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(5):657-658. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.9643
  • Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Milestones—Time for a Revolt?

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(11):1599-1600. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.5552

    This Viewpoint advocates simplifying the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Milestones.

  • Milestones and Competency-Based Medical Education in Internal Medicine

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(11):1601-1602. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.5556

    This Viewpoint discusses the positive effect of the ACGME Milestones initiative on preparing residents for unsupervised practice while also recognizing challenges.

  • Time to Eliminate the Step 2 Clinical Skills Examination for US Medical Graduates

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(9):1245-1246. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.3753

    This Invited Commentary examines arguments in favor of discontinuing the Step 2 Clinical Skills Examination.

  • Association of a Web-Based Handoff Tool With Rates of Medical Errors

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(9):1400-1402. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.4258

    This cohort study evaluates the effect of a web-based handoff tool on rates of medical errors in adult medical and surgical patients.

  • JAMA Internal Medicine June 1, 2016

    Figure 1: Study Flowchart

    Individuals with index community-associated, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections and members of their households in Northern Manhattan and South Bronx.aReasons for exclusion included being a resident in a long-term care facility, being hospitalized within the past 6 months, being homeless or living in a shelter, being younger than 1 year, being a member of a household that already participated in the study, or having a chronic illness, such as end-stage renal disease.
  • Evaluation of a Resident-Led Project to Decrease Phlebotomy Rates in the Hospital: Think Twice, Stick Once

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(5):708-710. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.0549

    This Research Letter describes a program for reducing the frequency of phlebotomy as a means of decreasing health care costs for laboratory testing.

  • JAMA Internal Medicine May 1, 2016

    Figure 1: Trends in Percentage of US Population Served by a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC)

    All graphs trace trends in the percent of the US population served by an FQHC, defined by the number of FQHC patients in the 50 US states in the demographic group specified, divided by the number of total US residents in that same demographic group. Counts of FQHC patients were determined using the Uniform Data System from the Health Resources and Services administration (HRSA) and included all patients seen at HRSA grantee FQHC organizations in the 50 US states. Corresponding population data were gathered yearly from the US Census’s American Community Survey. All groups had significant differences in trends when analyzed using ordinary least squares regression with interaction between demographic group and year (P ≤ .001). AI/AN indicates American Indian and Alaska native; FPL, federal poverty line.
  • Clinician Factors Associated With Prostate-Specific Antigen Screening in Older Veterans With Limited Life Expectancy

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(5):654-661. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.0695

    This study identifies clinician characteristics associated with higher prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening rates in older men with limited life expectancy, for whom there is guideline consensus that PSA screening should be avoided, and contrasts this with PSA screening in men with favorable life expectancy, for whom many guidelines still recommend individualized decision making.

  • JAMA Internal Medicine February 1, 2016

    Figure: Electronic Health Record Activity for General Medicine Inpatient Residents

    On the general medicine service, residents receive sign-out at 7 am, morning report is scheduled for 10 to 11 am, and the remaining morning hours are dedicated to rounds and patient care.