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  • Communicating Through a Patient Portal to Engage Family Care Partners

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.6325

    This survey study examines the use of patient portals to enhance the ability of family members to participate in communication with health care professionals.

  • Sharing and Healing Through Storytelling in Medicine

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(10):1409-1410. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.2996

    This Viewpoint describes an organization created to share stories and experiences of medical professionals.

  • A Research Agenda for Communication Between Health Care Professionals and Patients Living With Serious Illness

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(9):1361-1366. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.2005

    This Special Communication reviews the effect of communication by health care professionals on patients living with serious illness, identifies key evidence gaps in understanding the impact of communication on patient outcomes, and creates an agenda for future research.

  • Temporal Trends in the Numbers of Skilled Nursing Facility Specialists From 2007 Through 2014

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(9):1376-1378. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.2136

    This study of Medicare data quantifies recent increases in health care professionals working exclusively in skilled nursing facilities.

  • Association of Attitudes Regarding Overuse of Inpatient Laboratory Testing With Health Care Provider Type

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(8):1205-1207. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.1634

    This cross-sectional survey describes differences in attitudes and beliefs regarding laboratory testing among various physician and nonphysician health care providers.

  • Pagers and Beyond in an Era of Microcommunications—What Is Old Is New Again

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(8):1220-1221. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.2145
  • Emergency Department Query for Patient-Centered Approaches to Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity: The EQUALITY Study

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(6):819-828. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.0906

    This study determines attitudes and beliefs of patients and health care professionals on patients’ willingness to provide information on sexual orientation in the emergency department setting.

  • Alternative Alternative Payment Models

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(2):222-223. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.8280
  • JAMA Internal Medicine August 1, 2016

    Figure 1: Change in Total Mortality Associated With Increases in the Percentage of Energy From Specific Types of Fat

    Multivariable hazard ratios of total mortality associated with replacing the percentage of energy from total carbohydrates by the same energy from specific types of fat (P < .001 for trend for all) were used. The model was adjusted for age (in months), white race (yes vs no), marital status (with spouse, yes or no), body mass index (<23.0, 23.0-24.9, 25.0-29.9, 30.0-34.9, or ≥35.0 [calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared]), physical activity (<3.0, 3.0-8.9, 9.0-17.9, 18.0-26.9, or ≥27.0 h of metabolic equivalent tasks per week), smoking status (never, past, current 1-14 cigarettes/d, current 15-24 cigarettes/d, or current ≥25 cigarettes/d), alcohol consumption (women: 0, 0.1-4.9, 5.0-14.9, or ≥15.0 g/d; men: 0, 0.1-4.9, 5.0-29.9, or ≥30.0 g/d), multivitamin use (yes vs no), vitamin E supplement use (yes vs no), current aspirin use (yes vs no), family history of myocardial infarction (yes vs no), family history of diabetes (yes vs no), family history of cancer (yes vs no), history of hypertension (yes vs no), history of hypercholesterolemia (yes vs no), intakes of total energy and dietary cholesterol (quintiles), percentage of energy intake from dietary protein (quintiles), menopausal status and hormone use in women (premenopausal, postmenopausal never users, postmenopausal past users, or postmenopausal current users), and percentage of energy from the remaining specific types of fat (saturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids, and trans-fatty acids, all modeled as continuous variables). Results for the Nurses’ Health Study and Health Professional Follow-up Study from the multivariable model were combined using the fixed-effects model.
  • JAMA Internal Medicine August 1, 2016

    Figure 2: Multivariable Hazard Ratios (HRs) of Mortality by Isocaloric Substitution of Specific Types of Fatty Acid for Saturated Fatty Acids

    The model was adjusted for age (in months), white race (yes vs no), marital status (with spouse, yes or no), body mass index (<23.0, 23.0-24.9, 25.0-29.9, 30.0-34.9, or ≥35.0 [calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared]), physical activity (<3.0, 3.0-8.9, 9.0-17.9, 18.0-26.9, or ≥27.0 h of metabolic equivalent tasks per week), smoking status (never, past, current 1-14 cigarettes/d, current 15-24 cigarettes/d, or current ≥25 cigarettes/d), alcohol consumption (women: 0, 0.1-4.9, 5.0-14.9, or ≥15.0 g/d; men: 0, 0.1-4.9, 5.0-29.9, or ≥30.0 g/d), multivitamin use (yes vs no), vitamin E supplement use (yes vs no), current aspirin use (yes vs no), family history of myocardial infarction (yes vs no), family history of diabetes (yes vs no), family history of cancer (yes vs no), history of hypertension (yes vs no), history of hypercholesterolemia (yes vs no), intakes of total energy and dietary cholesterol (quintiles), percentage of energy intake from dietary protein (quintiles), menopausal status and hormone use in women (premenopausal, postmenopausal never users, postmenopausal past users, or postmenopausal current users), and percentage of energy from remaining fatty acids (saturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids [PUFAs], monounsaturated fatty acids [MUFAs], trans-fatty acids, ω-6 PUFAs, ω-3 PUFAs, linoleic acid, arachidonic acid, α-linolenic acid, and marine ω-3 fats, all modeled as continuous variables). Results for the Nurses’ Health Study and Health Professional Follow-up Study from the multivariable model were combined using the fixed-effects model. UFA indicates unsaturated fatty acid; and error bars, 95% CI.
  • Medicare’s Reimbursement Reduction for Nerve Conduction Studies: Effect on Use and Payments

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(5):697-699. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.0162

    This study examines whether a reduction in Medicare reimbursement for nerve conduction studies reduced the number of such studies conducted by health care professionals within a 1-year period.

  • What Other Industries Can Learn From Health Care

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(4):425-426. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2015.8406

    This Viewpoint discusses the ideals and values that other industries can learn from health care organizations.

  • Contamination of Health Care Personnel During Removal of Personal Protective Equipment

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2015; 175(12):1904-1910. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2015.4535

    This point-prevalence study of health care personnel reports on educational interventions to reduce the risk of contamination during removal of personal protective equipment.

  • The Increasing Visibility of the Threat of Health Care Worker Self-contamination

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2015; 175(12):1911-1912. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2015.5457
  • Association of Financial Integration Between Physicians and Hospitals With Commercial Health Care Prices

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2015; 175(12):1932-1939. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2015.4610

    This analysis of physician-hospital integration examines the changes in commercial prices and spending among a cohort of nonelderly Medicare enrollees.

  • JAMA Internal Medicine December 1, 2015

    Figure 1: Frequency of Skin and Clothing Contamination With Fluorescent Lotion During Removal of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

    Overall and hospital-specific rates of contamination of skin and clothing of health care personnel after removal of contaminated gloves or gowns.
  • Health Care Professionals’ Responses to Religious or Spiritual Statements by Surrogate Decision Makers During Goals-of-Care Discussions

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2015; 175(10):1662-1669. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2015.4124

    This qualitative study uses audio recordings of conversations between patients’ surrogate decision makers and health care professionals in the intensive care unit to characterize the frequency of and professional responses to religious or spiritual statements.

  • The Effect of Primary Care Provider Turnover on Patient Experience of Care and Ambulatory Quality of Care

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2015; 175(7):1157-1162. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2015.1853

    This observational study among a nationwide sample of patients reports that primary care provider turnover was associated with worse patient experiences of care but did not have a major effect on ambulatory care quality.

  • How Narrow a Network Is Too Narrow?

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2015; 175(3):337-338. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2014.7763
  • Invasive Group A Streptococcus Infections Associated With Liposuction Surgery at Outpatient Facilities Not Subject to State or Federal Regulation

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2014; 174(7):1136-1142. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2014.1875

    Beaudoin et al describe an outbreak of severe group A Streptococcus infections among persons undergoing tumescent liposuction between July 1 and September 14, 2012, at 2 outpatient cosmetic surgery facilities (one in Maryland and the other in Pennsylvania) not subject to state or federal regulation. See the invited commentary by Morgan and Harris.