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  • Work-Family Conflict and the Sex Difference in Depression Among Training Physicians

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.5138

    This prospective longitudinal study examines the increase in depressive symptoms during physicians’ internship year, its potentially disproportionate effect on women, and work-family conflict as a risk factor.

  • The Risk of Suicidality and Depression From 5-α Reductase Inhibitors

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(5):691-692. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.0096
  • Association of Suicidality and Depression With 5α-Reductase Inhibitors

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(5):683-691. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.0089

    This study examines the association of suicide, self-harm, and depression with 5α-reductase inhibitors for the treatment of prostatic enlargement among older men.

  • JAMA Internal Medicine October 1, 2016

    Figure 1: Percentages of Patients With Screen-Positive Depression and Serious Psychological Distress Treated for Depression by Health Care Professional Group

    Data are from Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys (2012-2013). Analysis limited to ages 18 years or older. Percentages (95% CIs) of adult sample treated for depression with screen-positive depression are: total, 29.9% (27.9-31.9); general medical only, 25.3% (23.0-27.6); psychiatrist, 45.4% (40.5-50.3); and other mental health professional, 40.3% (33.9-46.8). Corresponding percentages for serious psychological distress are: total, 21.8% (19.9-23.6); general medical only, 18.1% (16.0-20.2); psychiatrist, 34.9% (30.1-39.7); and other mental health professional, 31.9% (25.5-38.3).
  • Treatment of Adult Depression in the United States

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(10):1482-1491. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.5057

    This study uses Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data to characterize the prevalence of screen-positive depression and depression treatment in the United States in 2012 and 2013.

  • Changes in Utilization and Health Among Low-Income Adults After Medicaid Expansion or Expanded Private Insurance

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(10):1501-1509. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.4419

    This analysis of survey data assesses changes in access to care, utilization, and self-reported health among low-income adults in 3 states—Kentucky, Arkansas, and Texas—taking alternative approaches to the Affordable Care Act.

  • JAMA Internal Medicine July 1, 2016

    Figure: Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Depression Study Flow Diagram

    AUDIT indicates Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test; PDS, PTSD Diagnostic Scale; SCL-20, Somatic Symptom Severity Score-20.aA total of 273 participants had data at baseline and all follow-ups for PDS; 280 participants had data at baseline and all follow-ups for SCL-20.bA total of 271 participants had data at baseline and all follow-ups for PDS; 279 participants had data at baseline and all follow-ups for SCL-20.
  • Centrally Assisted Collaborative Telecare for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Depression Among Military Personnel Attending Primary Care: A Randomized Clinical Trial

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(7):948-956. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.2402

    This randomized clinical trial compares centrally assisted collaborative telecare with usual integrated care for military-related posttraumatic stress disorder and depression.

  • Association of Religious Service Attendance With Mortality Among Women

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(6):777-785. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.1615

    This prospective study uses data from the Nurses’ Health Study to evaluate associations between attendance at religious services and mortality in women.

  • JAMA Internal Medicine June 1, 2016

    Figure 2: Illustration of Interaction Effects

    Estimated changes in the end points for the ad libitum (AL) group are represented by solid circles. Estimated change in the end points for the calorie restriction (CR) group are represented by open circles. Illustrations of a body mass index × treatment × time interaction (A and B) and a sex × treatment interaction (C and D) for the Profile of Mood States (POMS) depression subscale are provided. In addition, a sex × treatment interaction on the sexual arousal subscale of the Derogatis Interview for Sexual Function–Self-report is illustrated (E and F). Error bars indicate SE.aSignificant differences between the AL and CR groups are denoted at the specified time point, with P = .005 for the difference between the AL and CR overweight participants at month 24 on the POMS depression scale; P = .03 and P = .02 for the difference between the AL and CR men on the POMS depression scale at months 6 and 12, respectively; and P = .04 for the difference between the AL and CR men at month 12 on the sexual arousal scale.
  • Smartphone-Based Conversational Agents and Responses to Questions About Mental Health, Interpersonal Violence, and Physical Health

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(5):619-625. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.0400

    This cross-sectional study examines how smartphone-based, computer programed conversational agents respond to questions about mental health, interpersonal violence, and physical health.

  • Effectiveness and Value of Integrating Behavioral Health Into Primary Care

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(5):691-692. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.0804

    This Evidence to Practice review assesses the comparative effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and budget implications of integrating behavioral health services into primary care settings compared with usual care.

  • JAMA Internal Medicine April 1, 2016

    Figure 2: Changes in Depressive Symptoms, Stress, and Weight Concerns Over Time for the STARTS and SUPPORT Interventions

    The CES-D Scale ranges from 0 to 60, the PSS ranges from 0 to 56, and Weight Concerns and Weight Self-efficacy range from 1 to 10. Women in STARTS reported significantly decreased weight concerns than women in SUPPORT at the 24-week assessment. The 2 intervention groups did not differ in weight concerns at any other assessment point. CES-D indicates Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression; PSS, Perceived Stress Scale; STARTS, Strategies to Avoid Returning to Smoking; and SUPPORT, a supportive, time and attention–controlled comparison.
  • Preventing Postpartum Smoking Relapse: A Randomized Clinical Trial

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(4):443-452. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.0248

    In this randomized clinical trial, among pregnant women who recently had quit smoking, intervention telephone calls and in-person visits were conducted through 24 weeks’ postpartum, and the relative efficacy of 2 different approaches to prevent postpartum relapse are compared.

  • JAMA Internal Medicine March 1, 2016

    Figure: Associations Between Lifetime Exposure to Marijuana and Cognitive Function

    Years of marijuana use modeled flexibly and current marijuana users at the year 25 visit excluded (n = 392). Results are adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, sex, study site, educational level, cigarette smoking, alcohol use, illicit drug use, cardiovascular risk factors, depression, mirror star tracing test score at the year 2 visit, and differential likelihood of follow-up (see the Methods section). All test results are standardized, such that a 1-U negative deviation indicates 1-SD worse cognitive function than the mean. Histograms describe the distribution of marijuana-years in participants in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study with any exposure to marijuana by presenting the frequency of participants in each considered interval. The inverse of the Stroop score is used in the present analyses to allow interpretation of worse cognitive function with negative standardized scores for all 3 cognitive function tests. DSST indicates Digit Symbol Substitution Test; RAVLT, Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test.
  • Shared Decision Making for Antidepressants in Primary Care: A Cluster Randomized Trial

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2015; 175(11):1761-1770. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2015.5214

    This cluster randomized trial studied the effectiveness of the Depression Medication Choice decision aid to help patients with moderate to severe depression and clinicians choose antidepressants together and found it improved the decision-making process and quality of care.

  • The Role of Decision Aids in Depression Care

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2015; 175(11):1770-1772. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2015.5243
  • Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Depression and Self-Care in Heart Failure Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2015; 175(11):1773-1782. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2015.5220

    This randomized clinical trial aimed to determine if cognitive behavior therapy for depression and self-care in heart failure patients was effective and found that, relative to usual care, the intervention improved depression but not heart failure self-care.

  • JAMA Internal Medicine November 1, 2015

    Figure 1: Flowchart of Screening, Enrollment, Randomization, and Follow-up

    aOf the 57 patients who completed treatment, 45 (79%) met all of the criteria for successful completion of weekly treatment within 6 months;12 (21%) did not meet 1 or more of the criteria at 6 months despite having remained in treatment.bReasons for noncompletion of 1 or more scheduled assessments (intervention arm): worsening medical illness or death (n = 7), unable to contact (n = 3), dropped out (n = 11). cReasons for noncompletion of 1 or more scheduled assessments (usual care arm): worsening medical illness or death (n = 7), unable to contact (n = 3), dropped out (n = 9).CBT indicates cognitive behavior therapy; PHQ-9, patient health questionnaire for depression.