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  • Older Adults’ Views and Communication Preferences About Cancer Screening Cessation

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(8):1121-1128. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.1778

    This qualitative interview study examines community-dwelling older adults’ perspectives on the decision to stop cancer screening when life expectancy is limited.

  • Talking to Patients About Cancer Screening Cessation

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(8):1128-1129. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.1795
  • Cancer Screening, Overdiagnosis, and Regulatory Capture

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2017; 177(7):915-916. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.1198

    This Editorial reviews the history of thyroid cancer diagnosis and mortality in light of the latest USPSTF recommendation against screening for the disease.

  • The Quality of Outpatient Care Delivered to Adults in the United States, 2002 to 2013

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(12):1778-1790. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.6217

    This cross-sectional survey study measures changes in outpatient quality and patient experience in the United States from 2002 to 2013 to determine whether efforts to improve outpatient quality have been successful.

  • JAMA Internal Medicine December 1, 2016

    Figure: Trends in Care and Patient Experience, 2002 to 2013

    A, Recommended clinical care composites. Comparison of 2002 and 2013: recommended cancer screening (P < .01), recommended diagnostic and preventive testing (P = .05), recommended diabetes care (P = .21), recommended counseling (P < .01), and recommended medical treatment (P < .01). B, Avoidance of inappropriate clinical care composites. Comparison of 2002 and 2013: inappropriate medical treatment avoidance (P < .01), inappropriate imaging avoidance (P = .64), inappropriate cancer screening avoidance (P = .02), and inappropriate antibiotic avoidance (P < .01). C, Patient experience measures were dichotomized as follows: response of 4 on a Likert scale of 1 to 4 (physician communication and access) or responses of 8, 9, or 10 on a Likert scale of 0 to 10 (global care) were counted as positive. Comparison of 2002 and 2013: global care (P < .01), physician communication (P < .01), and access (P < .01). Error bars indicate 95% CIs. See the eFigure in the Supplement for linear representation on a 0 to 10 scale.
  • Patient Navigation for Comprehensive Cancer Screening in High-Risk Patients Using a Population-Based Health Information Technology System: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(7):930-937. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.0841

    This randomised clinical trial examines the effect of patient navigation on breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening levels in low-income and racial/ethnic minority populations.

  • JAMA Internal Medicine July 1, 2016

    Figure 3: Rate Differences for All Cancer Screenings

    Rate differences and 95% CIs for all cancer screenings combined in intervention and comparison groups in patient and practice subgroups.
  • Cancer Screening Navigation: From Promising Practice to Standard of Care

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(7):937-938. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.2295
  • Population-Based Colonoscopy Screening for Colorectal Cancer: A Randomized Clinical Trial

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(7):894-902. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.0960

    This randomized clinical trial investigates participation rate, adenoma yield, performance, and adverse events of population-based colonoscopy screening in several European countries.

  • Cancer Screening After Unprovoked Venous Thromboembolism: A Teachable Moment

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(6):739-740. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.1783

    This Teachable Moment discusses how aggressive physicians should be in screening for an occult cancer in patients with unprovoked venous thromboembolism.

  • Unwarranted Cancer Screening: A Teachable Moment

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(5):590-591. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.0348

    This Teachable Moment demonstrates the cascade of events that can result from unnecessary testing for malignant disease, especially in patients with dementia.

  • Discussing Long-term Prognosis in Primary Care: Hard but Necessary

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(5):678-680. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.0972
  • Primary Care Practitioners’ Views on Incorporating Long-term Prognosis in the Care of Older Adults

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA Intern Med. 2016; 176(5):671-678. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2016.0670

    This qualitative study examines the beliefs and practices of primary care practitioners in discussing long-term prognosis with older adults.

  • Update on Medical Practices That Should Be Questioned in 2015

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2015; 175(12):1960-1964. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2015.5614

    This Special Communication identifies and highlights articles published in 2014 that are most likely to influence medical overuse, organized into the categories of overdiagnosis, overtreatment, and methods to avoid overuse.

  • Primary Care Provider-Delivered Smoking Cessation Interventions and Smoking Cessation Among Participants in the National Lung Screening Trial

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    JAMA Intern Med. 2015; 175(9):1509-1516. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2015.2391

    This case-control study found that when physicians assisted and arranged follow-up for smokers, rates of quitting smoking increased.

  • Contemporary Nationwide Patterns of Active Surveillance Use for Prostate Cancer

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA Intern Med. 2015; 175(9):1569-1571. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2015.2835

    This study examined the use of active surveillance and its predictors in prostate cancer treatment, finding that its use is low and should increase to reduce the overtreatment of screening-detected prostate cancer.

  • Tobacco Cessation—We Can Do Better

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2015; 175(9):1516-1517. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2015.2402
  • Competing Mortality in Cancer Screening: A Teachable Moment

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Intern Med. 2015; 175(6):896-897. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2015.1232
  • Colorectal Cancer Incidence by Age Among Patients Undergoing Surveillance Colonoscopy

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA Intern Med. 2015; 175(5):858-860. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2015.0344
  • JAMA Internal Medicine April 1, 2015

    Figure: Mean Marginal Estimates of Mean Cancer Screening Rates From Multivariable Mixed Models

    The interaction between practice socioeconomic environment and patient-centered medical home (PCMH) implementation. A, Breast cancer (BC) screening. B, Cervical cancer (CC) screening. C, Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. SES indicates socioeconomic status.