0
ARTICLE |

National Trends in the Concurrence of Tuberculosis and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

Dale R. Burwen, MD; Alan B. Bloch, MD; Lillian D. Griffin; Carol A. Ciesielski, MD; Harry A. Stern; Ida M. Onorato, MD
Arch Intern Med. 1995;155(12):1281-1286. doi:10.1001/archinte.1995.00430120062008.
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background:  Elucidation of the relationship between tuberculosis (TB) and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is needed to help predict the future course of these two epidemics. We examined nationwide trends in TB and AIDS occurring in the same individual.

Methods:  Health departments in the 50 states, District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and Guam matched their TB and AIDS case registries to determine the number of persons diagnosed with both TB and AIDS. The number of AIDS cases, TB cases, AIDS cases that matched with a TB case on the TB registry, and TB cases that matched with an AIDS case on the AIDS registry were reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Ga. Data were analyzed for the period from 1981 through 1991. The number of matched TB-AIDS cases was compared with a modeled estimate of excess TB cases during the period from 1985 through 1990.

Results:  From 1981 through 1991 there were 11 299 AIDS cases that matched with a TB case on the TB registry, representing 5.1% (geographic variation, 0% to 9.3%) of AIDS cases. The TB cases that matched with an AIDS case on the AIDS registry represent 4.3% (geographic variation, 0% to 15.1%) of TB cases from 1981 through 1991. Since 1981, matched TB and AIDS cases increased yearly through 1990. When examined by year of AIDS report, the percentage of AIDS cases that matched with a TB case increased from 1981 to 1982 (1.9% to 5.1%), remained fairly constant from 1983 through 1987 (range, 4.0% to 4.7%), increased in 1988 (5.4%) after extrapulmonary TB was added to the AIDS case definition, and increased slightly through 1990 (5.8%). When examined by year of TB report, the percentage of TB cases that matched with an AIDS case increased steadily from 1981 through 1990 (0.1% to 9.5%). The calculated fraction of excess TB cases during the period from 1985 through 1990 that could be accounted for by identified TB-AIDS cases was 30%.

Conclusion:  The risk of TB or AIDS among persons already diagnosed with one disease is much higher than among the general population. The percentage of persons with TB who are also diagnosed with AIDS has been increasing rapidly. Human immunodeficiency virus— induced immunosuppression is an important contributor to the TB epidemic and probably accounts for a minimum of 30% of excess TB cases during the period from 1985 through 1990.(Arch Intern Med. 1995;155:1281-1286)

Topics

Sign In to Access Full Content

Don't have Access?

Register and get free email Table of Contents alerts, saved searches, PowerPoint downloads, CME quizzes, and more

Subscribe for full-text access to content from 1998 forward and a host of useful features

Activate your current subscription (AMA members and current subscribers)

Purchase Online Access to this article for 24 hours

Figures

Tables

References

Correspondence

CME
Meets CME requirements for:
Browse CME for all U.S. States
Accreditation Information
The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
Note: You must get at least of the answers correct to pass this quiz.
You have not filled in all the answers to complete this quiz
The following questions were not answered:
Sorry, you have unsuccessfully completed this CME quiz with a score of
The following questions were not answered correctly:
Commitment to Change (optional):
Indicate what change(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Your quiz results:
The filled radio buttons indicate your responses. The preferred responses are highlighted
For CME Course: A Proposed Model for Initial Assessment and Management of Acute Heart Failure Syndromes
Indicate what changes(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).
Submit a Comment

Multimedia

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Web of Science® Times Cited: 48

Sign In to Access Full Content

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Jobs
brightcove.createExperiences();