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Invited Commentary |

Physical Activity: An Investment That Pays Multiple Health Dividends:  Comment on “Combined Effects of Cardiorespiratory Fitness, Not Smoking, and Normal Waist Girth on Morbidity and Mortality in Men,” “Physical Activity and Survival in Male Colorectal Cancer Survival,” “Effects of a Television Viewing Reduction on Energy Intake and Expenditure in Overweight and Obese Adults,” and “Physical Activity and Rapid Decline in Kidney Function Among Older Adults”

Janet E. Fulton, PhD; Denise G. Simons-Morton, MD, PhD; Deborah A. Galuska, PhD, MPH
Arch Intern Med. 2009;169(22):2124-2127. doi:10.1001/archinternmed.2009.413.
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During difficult economic times, it is especially important to invest limited resources wisely. Choosing an investment strategy that will ultimately garner rewards requires strategies that turn low-risk investments into high-yield returns. This economic analogy is relevant to strategies for investing not only in the stock market but also in our health.

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Lee  C-DSui  XBlair  SN Combined effects of cardiorespiratory fitness, not smoking, and normal waist girth on morbidity and mortality in men. Arch Intern Med 2009;169 (22) 2096
Otten  JJJones  KELittenberg  BHarvey-Berino  J Effects of a television viewing reduction on energy intake and expenditure in overweight and obese adults: a randomized controlled trial. Arch Intern Med 2009;169 (22) 2109- 2115
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Figure.

Summary of research findings on physical activity and health. Total minutes in a week of moderate-intensity physical activity, such as brisk walking, that can promote health or help prevent disease or death. Health outcomes are ranked from lowest to highest amount of physical activity needed. Physical activity estimates are taken from reference 5 and were converted into a common metric of minutes per week of moderate-intensity (4 metabolic equivalent task [MET] h/wk) physical activity. The lengths of the lines indicate the range of minutes associated with benefit in that health category (eg, 120-150 min/wk) and are taken from reference 5.

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