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Correction |

Errors in Data Reporting in: The Magnitude of Acute Serum Creatinine Increase After Cardiac Surgery and the Risk of Chronic Kidney Disease, Progression of Kidney Disease, and Death FREE

Arch Intern Med. 2011;171(21):1919. doi:10.1001/archinternmed.2011.597.
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Errors in Data Reporting. In the article titled “The Magnitude of Acute Serum Creatinine Increase After Cardiac Surgery and the Risk of Chronic Kidney Disease, Progression of Kidney Disease, and Death” by Ishani et al, published in the February 14 issue of the Archives (2011;171[3]:226-233), some of the values were incorrect but the figures based on the text were correct: “The incidence of CKD during the entire follow-up period was 25.1% among patients with no CKD at baseline and no increase in creatinine levels after surgery. This percentage compared with an incidence of CKD of 33.7%, 44.1%, 51.1%, and 53.4% for patients with no CKD at baseline and creatinine increase classes I, II, III, and IV after surgery, respectively (P for linear trend, <.001)” should have read “The incidence of CKD during the entire follow-up period was 24.7% among patients with no CKD at baseline and no increase in creatinine following surgery. This compared with an incidence of CKD of 30.8%, 41.5%, 48.5%, and 47.5% for patients with no CKD at baseline and classes I, II, III, and IV of creatinine increase following surgery, respectively (P for linear trend, <.001).” and “Among the individuals with CKD at baseline without an increase in creatinine levels after surgery, the incidence of CKD stage progression was 25%. Among individuals with CKD at baseline and an increase in creatinine levels after surgery, there was a graded increase in the proportion of individuals with the development of worsening CKD stage by magnitude of creatinine increase: class I, 33.7%; class II, 44.1%; class III, 51.1%; and class IV, 53.4% (P for linear trend, <.01) (Figure 1)” should have read “Among the individuals with CKD at baseline without an increase in creatinine levels after surgery, the incidence of CKD stage progression was 26.4%. Among individuals with CKD at baseline and an increase in creatinine following surgery, there was a graded increase in the proportion of individuals with development of worsening CKD stage by magnitude of creatinine increase: class I, 43.3%; class II, 52.9%; class III, 57.9%; and class IV, 67.2% (P for linear trend <.01) (Figure 1).” These changes do not affect the outcome of the study.

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