0
Research Letters | HEALTH CARE REFORM|

Hearing Loss Prevalence in the United States FREE

Frank R. Lin, MD, PhD; John K. Niparko, MD; Luigi Ferrucci, MD, PhD
[+] Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine (Drs Lin and Niparko), Center on Aging and Health, The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions (Dr Lin), and Longitudinal Studies Section, Clinical Research Branch, National Institute on Aging (Dr Ferrucci), Baltimore, Maryland.


Arch Intern Med. 2011;171(20):1851-1853. doi:10.1001/archinternmed.2011.506.
Text Size: A A A
Published online

The prevalence of hearing loss in the US population has been estimated from self-reported data1 or in age-restricted cohorts.2 These estimates may not accurately reflect the true burden of hearing loss in the United States. We estimated the overall prevalence of audiometric hearing loss among all individuals (age ≥12 years) in the United States using data from a nationally representative data set and with a definition of hearing loss recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO).

We analyzed data from the 2001 through 2008 cycles of the National Health and Nutritional Examination Surveys (NHANES), an ongoing epidemiological survey designed to assess the health and functional status of the civilian, noninstitutionalized US population.3 Air conduction pure-tone audiometry was administered to all participants aged 12 to 19 years from 2005 through 2008 (n = 3143), a half sample of all participants aged 20 to 69 years from 2001 through 2004 (n = 3630), and all participants 70 years and older from 2005 through 2006 (n = 717). Audiometry was performed in a sound-attenuating booth according to established NHANES protocols. A speech-frequency pure-tone average (average of hearing thresholds at 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kHz) of greater than 25 dB HL (hearing level) in both ears was defined as hearing loss per WHO criteria,4 and this is the level at which hearing loss begins to impair communication in daily life. Hearing loss prevalence was estimated by age decade, sex, and the 3 largest categories of race/ethnicity (non-Hispanic white [white], non-Hispanic black [black], and Mexican American or other Hispanic [Hispanic]). There were insufficient individuals from other racial/ethnic groups to derive reliable age-stratified estimates. However, individuals from all racial and ethnic categories were included in estimates of overall prevalence. US population counts were estimated using the midpoint of population totals in each cycle and averaged across combined cycles when appropriate. We accounted for the complex sampling design in all analyses by using sample weights according to National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) guidelines.

We estimate that 30.0 million or 12.7% of Americans 12 years and older had bilateral hearing loss from 2001 through 2008, and this estimate increases to 48.1 million or 20.3% when also including individuals with unilateral hearing loss (Table). Overall, the prevalence of hearing loss increases with every age decade. The prevalence of hearing loss is lower in women than in men and black vs white individuals across nearly all age decades.

Table Graphic Jump LocationTable. Prevalence and Number of Individuals in the United States With Hearing Lossa

For individuals 12 years and older in the United States, nearly 1 in 8 has bilateral hearing loss, and nearly 1 in 5 has a unilateral or bilateral hearing loss. These are the first national estimates of hearing loss in the US population based on audiometric data and a large, well-characterized representative sample. Previous national estimates based on self-reported data1 and age-restricted cohorts2 have been lower, in a range of 21 to 29 million. Other estimates of hearing loss prevalence have come from population-based cohorts5 that are not representative of the US population. While the overall risk of hearing loss may be decreasing over time,6,7 the prevalence of hearing loss is expected to rise because of the aging of the population. Research is needed to understand the impact of hearing loss on cognition8 and other functional domains and the role of aural rehabilitative strategies in possibly mitigating these effects.

Correspondence: Dr Lin, Department of Otolaryngology–Head & Neck Surgery, The Johns Hopkins Center on Aging & Health, 2024 E Monument St, Ste 2-700, Baltimore, MD 21205 (flin1@jhmi.edu).

Author Contributions: Dr Lin had full access to all the data in the study and takes responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis. Study concept and design: Lin. Analysis and interpretation of data: Lin, Niparko, and Ferrucci. Drafting of the manuscript: Lin. Critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content: Lin, Niparko, and Ferrucci. Statistical analysis: Lin. Obtained funding: Lin. Administrative, technical, and material support: Lin, Niparko, and Ferrucci. Study supervision: Niparko and Ferrucci.

Financial Disclosure: None reported.

Funding/Support: This work was support by grant K23DC011279 from the National Institutes of Health.

Role of the Sponsors: The funding organization had no role in the design and conduct of the study; in the collection, analysis, and interpretation of the data; or in the preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript.

This article was corrected for a typographical error on May 8, 2012.

Ries PW. Prevalence and characteristics of persons with hearing trouble: United States, 1990-91.  Vital Health Stat 10. 1994;(188):1-75
PubMed
Agrawal Y, Platz EA, Niparko JK. Prevalence of hearing loss and differences by demographic characteristics among US adults: data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999-2004.  Arch Intern Med. 2008;168(14):1522-1530
PubMed
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and National Center for Health Statistics.  National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Hyattsville, MD: US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhanes.html. Accessed June 1, 2011
World Health Organization Prevention of Blindness and Deafness (PBD) Program.  Prevention of deafness and hearing impaired grades of hearing impairment. http://www.who.int/pbd/deafness/hearing_impairment_grades/en/index.html. Accessed June 1, 2011
Nash SD, Cruickshanks KJ, Klein R,  et al.  The prevalence of hearing impairment and associated risk factors: the Beaver Dam Offspring Study.  Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(5):432-439
PubMed
Zhan W, Cruickshanks KJ, Klein BE,  et al.  Generational differences in the prevalence of hearing impairment in older adults.  Am J Epidemiol. 2010;171(2):260-266
PubMed
Hoffman HJ, Dobie RA, Ko CW, Themann CL, Murphy WJ. Americans hear as well or better today compared with 40 years ago: hearing threshold levels in the unscreened adult population of the United States, 1959-1962 and 1999-2004.  Ear Hear. 2010;31(6):725-734
PubMed
Lin FR, Metter EJ, O’Brien RJ, Resnick SM, Zonderman AB, Ferrucci L. Hearing loss and incident dementia.  Arch Neurol. 2011;68(2):214-220
PubMed

Figures

Tables

Table Graphic Jump LocationTable. Prevalence and Number of Individuals in the United States With Hearing Lossa

References

Ries PW. Prevalence and characteristics of persons with hearing trouble: United States, 1990-91.  Vital Health Stat 10. 1994;(188):1-75
PubMed
Agrawal Y, Platz EA, Niparko JK. Prevalence of hearing loss and differences by demographic characteristics among US adults: data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999-2004.  Arch Intern Med. 2008;168(14):1522-1530
PubMed
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and National Center for Health Statistics.  National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Hyattsville, MD: US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhanes.html. Accessed June 1, 2011
World Health Organization Prevention of Blindness and Deafness (PBD) Program.  Prevention of deafness and hearing impaired grades of hearing impairment. http://www.who.int/pbd/deafness/hearing_impairment_grades/en/index.html. Accessed June 1, 2011
Nash SD, Cruickshanks KJ, Klein R,  et al.  The prevalence of hearing impairment and associated risk factors: the Beaver Dam Offspring Study.  Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011;137(5):432-439
PubMed
Zhan W, Cruickshanks KJ, Klein BE,  et al.  Generational differences in the prevalence of hearing impairment in older adults.  Am J Epidemiol. 2010;171(2):260-266
PubMed
Hoffman HJ, Dobie RA, Ko CW, Themann CL, Murphy WJ. Americans hear as well or better today compared with 40 years ago: hearing threshold levels in the unscreened adult population of the United States, 1959-1962 and 1999-2004.  Ear Hear. 2010;31(6):725-734
PubMed
Lin FR, Metter EJ, O’Brien RJ, Resnick SM, Zonderman AB, Ferrucci L. Hearing loss and incident dementia.  Arch Neurol. 2011;68(2):214-220
PubMed

Correspondence

CME
Meets CME requirements for:
Browse CME for all U.S. States
Accreditation Information
The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
Note: You must get at least of the answers correct to pass this quiz.
You have not filled in all the answers to complete this quiz
The following questions were not answered:
Sorry, you have unsuccessfully completed this CME quiz with a score of
The following questions were not answered correctly:
Commitment to Change (optional):
Indicate what change(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Your quiz results:
The filled radio buttons indicate your responses. The preferred responses are highlighted
For CME Course: A Proposed Model for Initial Assessment and Management of Acute Heart Failure Syndromes
Indicate what changes(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).
Submit a Comment

Multimedia

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Web of Science® Times Cited: 21

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

See Also...
Articles Related By Topic
PubMed Articles
JAMAevidence.com

The Rational Clinical Examination
Make the Diagnosis: Hearing Impairment

The Rational Clinical Examination
Original Article: Does This Patient Have Hearing Impairment?